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CLEAN Network Teleconferences
Each Tuesday at 1:00pm Eastern Time (12pm Central, 11am Mountain, 10am Pacific) CLEAN Network members meet on a teleconference call to update each other about their climate literacy projects, upcoming events, and funding opportunities and share information about best practices, key teaching/learning resources, and the development of collaborative activities. Often these teleconferences include special presentations by members and guests.

To participate in these teleconferences, you need to be a member of the CLEAN Network. To join the Network, sign up here Join CLEAN Network.

Members receive an email alert from the CLEAN Network listserv with information about each week's teleconference.

Upcoming 2017 Teleconferences

Recent Telecons | Past Telecons

March 28, 2017: Hot Topics in Climate Communication with Susan Joy Hassol

Abstract: For this network and beyond, our work in communicating about climate change has never been more important. From the threats posed by the new political climate, to fake news, to some in our community still shooting themselves in the foot on some issues, the challenges are enormous. I'll discuss my current thinking on these issues including some of my recently published articles on these topics. We'll focus on words that matter and issues that arise as we pursue the world's most important and time-sensitive conversation.

Bio: Susan Joy Hassol is the Director of Climate Communication, known for her ability to translate science into English. For more than 25 years she has helped scientists, journalists, and others communicate more effectively on climate. She was the Senior Science Writer on all three National Climate Assessments, wrote an HBO documentary, has testified before Congress, publishes widely, and leads communication workshops. She's an elected fellow of AAAS for her "exceptional contributions in the area of science communication, particularly for communication of the science of climate change to policymakers and the public." For more see www.climatecommunication.org

April 4, 2017: Informal Discussion

April 11, 2017: Climate Change Education: What Works? with Martha Monroe, University of Florida

Abstract: A recent systematic literature review explored climate change education to understand effective strategies for teaching about this topic. Using the EBSCOhost search engine, we found 959 unique records and screened these abstracts for studies including empirically measured outcomes of an educational intervention. A final sample of 49 papers were read by the research team and several common themes emerged from analysis. While several themes create effective instruction for any topic (e.g., relevant, meaningful, experiential), working with climate change can make these qualities more difficult to achieve. Additional characteristics seem to be important for controversial and value-laden issues, such as addressing misconceptions, interacting with scientists, conducting projects, and engaging in deliberative discussion. This presentation will introduce the process of a systematic review and explain the themes that we found.

This presentation is part of the eeWORKS program of the North American Association for Environmental Education. This work was funded by the Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation project (PINEMAP), which is a Coordinated Agricultural Project funded bythe USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture under Award # 2011-68002-30185.

Bio: Martha Monroe is responsible for extension activities, research, and courses related to environmental education, conservation behavior, and human dimensions of wildland-urban interface issues. Her work includes the development and evaluation of curriculum resources for educators and understanding how people perceive issues such as wildfire and woody biomass in the South. She is exploring strategies for engaging people in helpful dialogue and productive change as we move toward sustainability.

April 18, 2017: Jason Davis

April 25, 2017: Informal Discussion

May 2, 2017: Transitioning States and Countries to 100% Clean, Renewable Energy for all Purposes with Mark Jacobson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University

Abstract: Global warming, air pollution, and energy insecurity are three of the most significant problems facing the world today. This talk discusses the development of technical and economic plans to convert the energy infrastructure of each of the 50 United States and 139 countries of the world to those powered by 100% wind, water, and sunlight (WWS) for all purposes, namely electricity, transportation, industry, and heating/cooling, after energy efficiency measures have been accounted for. Results showing the ability of the grid to remain stable at low cost under 100% WWS conditions are also provided. Please see http://web.stanford.edu/group/efmh/jacobson/Articles/I/WWS-50-USState-plans.html for more information.

Bio: Mark Z. Jacobson is Director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment and of the Precourt Institute for Energy. He received a B.S. in Civil Engineering, an A.B. in Economics, and an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Stanford in 1988. He received an M.S. and PhD in Atmospheric Sciences in 1991 and 1994, respectively, from UCLA and joined the faculty at Stanford in 1994. He has published two textbooks of two editions each and ~150 peer-reviewed journal articles. He received the 2005 AMS Henry G. Houghton Award and the 2013 AGU Ascent Award for his work on black carbon climate impacts and the 2013 Global Green Policy Design Award for developing state and country energy plans. In 2015, he received a Cozzarelli Prize from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for his work on the grid integration of 100% wind, water and solar energy systems. He has served on an advisory committee to the U.S. Secretary of Energy, appeared in a TED talk, appeared on the David Letterman Show to discuss converting the world to clean energy, and cofounded The Solutions Project (www.thesolutionsproject.org).

May 9, 2017: Informal Discussion

May 16, 2017: The Lowell School: Integrating Climate Change Across the Humanities with Kristen Poppleton, Director of Education at Climate Generation

May 23, 2017: Informal Discussion

May 30, 2017: Phillip Vaughter, United Nations University

June 6, 2017: Informal Discussion

June 13, 2017: Informal Discussion

June 20, 2017 :Informal Discussion

Recent Teleconferences

March 21, 2017: Informal Discussion

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 83.8MB Mar21 17).

March 14, 2017: Systems Thinking in Climate Change Education with Jeremy Solin, Wisconsin Coordinator and National Program Manager of ThinkWater

Abstract: Addressing climate change starts with deeper learning, understanding, and caring, and that true understanding and behavior change requires more than new information. That's where systems thinking comes in. During the presentation, we'll highlight the ThinkWater systems thinking framework and share key strategies and resources that could help build the movement of climate thinkers. Participants will gain new tools and resources to enhance their climate change education programs. Maybe the next big thing in climate change education, research, and outreach is thinking, systems thinking. For a brief introduction, see these short videos about ThinkWater and Systems Thinking.

Bio: Jeremy Solin is the Wisconsin Coordinator and National Program Manager of ThinkWater, a national campaign supported by USDA to help people of all backgrounds and ages think and care deeply about water. He is applying systems thinking to community water education in Wisconsin and working with partners across the US to apply systems thinking in their organizations and programs. He's worked in the environmental and sustainability education fields for nearly 20 years. He has a bachelor's degree in water resources (University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point), a master's degree in environmental education (University of Minnesota, Duluth) and a doctoral degree in sustainability education (Prescott College).

You can find the presentation here (Acrobat (PDF) 3.6MB Mar13 17).

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 60.7MB Mar14 17).

March 7, 2017: Exploring the BayCLIC model with Oksana Shcherba

Bio: Oksana Shcherba is the Climate Education Program Manager at the Institute at the Golden Gate, a program of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. Oksana has a background in public administration and policy, with an emphasis in environmental policy. She has worked with local governments, including the City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, as well as environmental advocacy groups such as the Environmental Defense Fund on initiatives ranging from outlining open space needs in underserved neighborhoods to promoting sustainable fishing practices. She holds a Bachelor's in Politics from the University of San Francisco and a Master's in Public Administration from the University of Southern California.

Abstract: For the past two years, the Bay Area Climate Literacy Impact Collaborative (BayCLIC) has been convening environmental education leaders in the San Francisco Bay Area around the common mission of education and promoting action around climate change. This consortium of informal educators, ranging from zoos to nature centers, was formed to address the significant challenges facing climate communicators in the region (and nationwide). These issues included a discomfort among educators in speaking about climate science, a need for local climate data, staff time to plan out programs, ways to move audiences to action, and more. Given this clear need and an expressed interest from local educators to collaborate on this issue, BayCLIC was launched to cultivate a supportive community that equips climate communicators with tools to build effective climate focused programs. Having identified the highest priorities through a collaborative process, BayCLIC is focusing on connecting educators to local climate science resources, providing them with climate education tools and trainings, and piloting climate action campaigns focused on moving social norms. During this webinar we will discuss how BayCLIC came to be, how we function, and our upcoming projects, which include a website and climate action campaign. As we're just now launching a couple new projects, audience feedback, thoughts, and questions are highly encouraged!

You can find a copy of the presentation here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 4.8MB Mar7 17).

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 34.3MB Mar7 17).

February 28, 2017: Informal Discussion

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 24MB Mar1 17).

February 21, 2017: The Good, the Bad, and the ALL CAPS: Examining the Climate Change Debate on Facebook with Karin Kirk

Abstract: The conversation about climate change on social media never fails to be illuminating. To learn more about the climate change conversation on Facebook, over 600 comments from 6 articles about climate science were analyzed. Every post was read and scored for the content, tone, and rationale. Although all the comments were posted on Facebook, the originating articles were from six different sources: the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, Fox News, NOAA, and NASA.

The analysis showed that the proportion of posts that dismiss climate science is greater than the proportion of people in the US who do not believe in anthropogenic climate change. In other words, the dismissive voices have an outsized effect compared to nationwide public opinion. Analysis of the tone of the posts showed that uncivil behavior was freely demonstrated by people on both sides of the issue, but was significantly more common among detractors of climate science. Deeper analysis of the tone of the conversation showed that it varied widely depending on the hosting page. The conversations at NOAA and NASA were the most productive, while the comments at Fox News were the most vitriolic. These conclusions were reached via quantitative analyses.

Understanding the discourse around climate change can help educators predict the types of misconceptions and disinformation their students are likely to encounter. Furthermore, learning about the flow of topics and user behaviors can help government and environmental agencies manage their interactions on social media. Lastly, as scientists and educators, being attentive to this conversation allows us to be more effective in our own efforts to share scientific information with disparate audiences.


Bio:Karin Kirk has been a member of the CLEAN team since the inception of the project. Her recent projects include a usability study of NOAA's Climate.gov web portal, co-authoring high school climate science curriculum, and writing about climate change for ski and snowboard instructors. In this Facebook study, she collaborated with John Cook of Skeptical Science, as part of a larger effort to characterize the many facets of climate denial. Karin recently delivered a TEDx talk, "Healing the Divide on Climate Change."

You can find the presentation slides here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 8.2MB Feb21 17).

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 46.3MB Feb22 17).

February 14, 2017: W!ld Center Report Back from Sri Lanka, with Jen Krester and Dr. Novil Wijesekara

Abstract: Jen Kretser, Director of Programs and Katie Morgan, Adirondack Youth Climate Program Coordinator from The Wild Center will report out on the first Sri Lanka Youth Climate Summit taking place January 20-22, 2017. Through a competitive process 100 students from Sri Lankan universities have been selected to participate in the Youth Climate Summit and will work to create Climate Action Initiatives. The Selected Climate Action initiatives of participants will then be provided with incubation support through mentorship, advocacy, networking and resource mobilization through partner organizations and experts. The US Embassy in Sri Lanka is the main funding Partner while the Climate Change Secretariat of the Ministry of Environment and Mahaweli Development and The Wild Centre in New York are the technical partners for the YCS. The Disaster Management Centre, Asia Pacific Alliance for Disaster Management Sri Lanka, Janathakshan, Sri Lanka Youth Climate Action Network (SLYCAN), Eco-V Volunteers and many corporate sector organizations are also joining hands to make this summit a success. The main organizer is the Community Resilience Center, a volunteer lead organization, dedicated to promote community capacity against challenges such as natural disasters, environmental pollution and climate change.

You can find the slides here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 20.8MB Feb14 17).

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 32.7MB Feb14 17).

February 7, 2017: Informal Discussion

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 28.7MB Feb7 17)

January 31, 2017: Informal Discussion

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 29.9MB Jan31 17)

January 24, 2017: Informal Discussion

You can find the video recording here (MP4 Video 29.9MB Jan24 17)

January 17, 2017: Youth Perspective On Climate & Justice with ACE Fellows

Abstract: A youth perspective on climate and justice, and how ACE Fellows aim to use climate action as a tool for equity building.

Bio: Eva Lin, ACE Fellow

Eva Lin is a senior at South San Francisco High School and is originally from Taipei, Taiwan. At the age of 6, she moved to the U.S. with her small family of four, and together they built a life for themselves. Once in high school, Eva joined her school's Earth Club to dedicate her free time to cleaning up her community. She attended various clean-ups throughout the years and takes care of her school's recycling routine on a weekly basis. In 2014, Eva joined the National Honor Society to help those in need by attending multiple community service events, including working in a soup kitchen and participating in even more clean-ups.

Keliana Hui, ACE Fellow

Keliana Hui is a senior at South San Francisco High School and has lived in the Bay Area her entire life. She believes that everyone should take a part in helping the environment because everyone is connected to the environment, no matter who they are. Keliana wants to raise her voice in the environmental community and inform people of their role in climate change.

You can find a copy of the presentation here (Acrobat (PDF) 9.5MB Jan17 17).

You can find a video recording of the presentation here (MP4 Video 28MB Jan17 17).

January 10, 2017: Planning for Climate Change in Detroit: The Story of the Detroit Climate Action Collaborative with Kimberly Hill Knott

Abstract: Detroiters working for Environmental Justice convened the Detroit Climate Action Collaborative in 2011 out of the recognition that preparing for a warming world would be necessary for improving quality of life in the city. This group is rising the city of Detroit's first Climate Action Plan.

This is a unique initiative because it is led by an environmental justice non-profit that convenes partner organizations from universities, businesses, government and non-profits, and incorporates community review of the plan. As Kimberly Hill Knott likes to say, it's an effort "from the bottom up by force." The process has persevered despite the city's challenges– emergency management, bankruptcy, and the lingering effects of disinvestment. In this webinar, you will hear from Kimberly Hill Knott, who will delve into the DCAC process, and Leila Mekias, who will talk about the youth climate summit program.

Bio: Kimberly Hill Knott, Policy Director at DWEJ

After spending over a decade working under the leadership of Congressman John Conyers (Ranking Member, House Judiciary Committee), as a Legislative Assistant, Kimberly furthered her interest in the political arena by joining the staff of Detroiters working for Environmental Justice (DWEJ), as Policy Director. DWEJ is an award winning social enterprise, dedicated to Detroit becoming the global model of a vibrant urban center, with an emphasis on promoting sustainable redevelopment and environmental justice.

You can find the presentation here (PowerPoint 6.3MB Jan10 17)

You can find a video recording of the meeting here (MP4 Video 49.9MB Jan10 17).

January 3, 2017: Informal Discussion

A video recording of this teleconference call is [ file 109913 'here']

Past Teleconferences

2016 Teleconferences

2015 Teleconferences

2014 Teleconferences

2013 Teleconferences

2012 Teleconferences

2011 Teleconferences

2010 Teleconferences

2009 and 2008 Teleconferences
If anyone has material from the 2009 and 2008 teleconference calls, please contact Tamara Ledley. We would like to preserve our historic record. Thanks.